Archive for the ‘government powers’ Category

Real World Graduation, Question 63: Impeachment

RealWorldGraduation_Question_63_Impeachment   <– PDF

State legislatures have a power to impeach (convict) a state Governor and to remove him from office. Suppose a Governor of a state has been implicated in a wide variety of corrupt activities, and federal investigators have videotapes, emails, and wiretapped phone calls in which the Governor is observed engaging in numerous criminal conspiracies to commit fraud and bribery.  The evidence is provided to the state legislature by the investigating authorities.  The Governor refuses to resign his office.  How soon will the state legislature impeach the Governor and remove him from office?

a) Within a few hours

b) Within a few days

c) Within a few weeks

d) Within a few months

e) As soon as possible, consistent with the procedures called out in the state constitution.

(The answer is on p. 2 of the PDF.)

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Real World Graduation, Question 55: The Tax Code

RealWorldGraduation_Question_55_TaxCode   <– PDF

A man has earned income in a certain year. He took the “standard deduction” on his federal “gross income” tax, and as a result, his “taxable income” is taxed at 25%.  If he had made a $100 “tax-deductible” contribution that year, how much would his federal tax have changed?

a) “Tax deductible” refers only to state taxes, so his federal tax would remain unchanged.

b) His tax would have been reduced by $100.

c) The “tax deduction” only applies in the following year, so he would get a reduction next year, not now; his tax for the current year is unchanged.

d) His tax would be 25% of his gross income less the $100, or the amount previously calculated, whichever is less.

e) His total tax is 25% of $100 = $25.

(The answer is on p. 2 of the PDF.)

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RealWorldGraduation_Question_54_PledgeOfAllegiance   <–  PDF

In 1892, in preparation for the celebration of the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of America, a magazine in Boston called The Youth’s Companion published a “pledge to the flag” to be recited by schoolchildren.  It is believed to have been written either by Francis Bellamy or James Upham.  The pledge has undergone several revisions in the years since; it currently reads:

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with justice and liberty for all.”

Although it was originally devised for schoolchildren, it was eventually adopted in 1942 as part of the United States Flag Code (U. S. C. Title 36). What is the purpose of such a pledge?

a) To inspire people to be proud of living in a nation that has liberty and justice for all

b) To emphasize that only people who believe in God can be Americans

c) To remind people that America cannot be divided

d) To confirm that the people are the ultimate sovereign in America

e) A combination of a), c), and d)

(The answer is shown on p. 2 of the PDF.)

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Posted in Benjamin Franklin, Bill of Rights, critical thinking, government powers, Real World Graduation, U. S. Constitution | No Comments »

Real World Graduation, Question 52: Your Rights

RealWorldGraduation_Question_52_Your_Rights   <– PDF

A certain man was a successful politician for many years. He gradually rose through the ranks from a city council member to state Representative to state Senator to federal Congressman to federal Senator.  In all those years, he was a consistent advocate for gun control, including various proposals to ban all guns and ammunition held by private persons.  He himself always lived in places with strict gun control, but he also was always in violation of the existing gun laws: he owned many guns that were banned, he failed to register guns he owned, and he bought and sold guns without the legal reporting requirements.  He was called upon to serve as an under-Secretary of a cabinet-level department by the new presidential administration.  As part of the vetting process, he was asked if he had ever violated any gun laws.  He lied about his guns, and the administration believed him, since he had a “perfect” voting record promoting and enacting gun control.  But once he was confirmed by the Senate, it came to light that he had in fact owned many guns, some of them illegally, and had committed numerous violations of the existing gun laws (some of which he had helped to pass at the state and federal level).  What will happen next?

a) He will be fired by the President.

b) He will resign in disgrace.

c) He will be investigated by the federal authorities.

d) He will be indicted by state and local authorities.

e) Either a) or b), followed by either c) or d).

(The answer is on p. 2 of the PDF.)

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Posted in Bill of Rights, critical thinking, government powers, gun control, habeas corpus, progressive, Real World Graduation, Second Amendment, U. S. Constitution | No Comments »